Real Deal Steel FAQ

  1. What Does Officially Licensed Mean?
    1. Why is it licensed?
    2. Why isn’t it licensed?
    3. Which one is better?
    4. Do GM and Ford inspect and endorse the products?
    5. Do GM and Ford control the quality of the products?
    6. What does licensing cost?
  2. Registration Questions
    1. What kind of records and paperwork do I need to register the car?
    2. What is an MSO (MCO)?
    3. What if I have an existing title and VIN?
    4. More helpful tips for you:
    5. How do I title and register a car built using a Real Deal Steel body?
  3. Body Questions
    1. What sequence should I replace the floor, trunk floor and inner quarters on my rotted '57 convertible? - Dwayne
    2. I'm interested in a 1969 Camaro coupe body. How does your build compare to that done by Dynacorn?
    3. I'm in the process of restoring a '57 Chevy 2-door sedan that will require some extensive sheet metal replacement -- including the full floor, both rear quarters, tail pan, fin panels, and possibly the inner quarters. My plan was to go with the pre-widene
    4. I have one of your new '57 2-door sedan bodies. Would you mind telling me the 57 model frames that will fit the 2-door sedan body?
    5. I have a 1957 Chevy 2-door post. It was a race car most of its life and I'd like to convert it to a convertible/roadster. I know the door line on the post is straight across, rather than gently sloping, like the bel air and convertible.
    6. Do you offer any special order modifications for the 1968 Camaro? I was thinking along the lines of shaving drip rails and filling side marker lights.
    7. Do you have bodies in stock?
  4. Parts Questions
    1. Would Buzzkil sound deadener be suitable for insulating the roof over the headliner in a 56 Chevy? Would it stay attached to the roof and NEVER fall down onto the headliner even when sitting out in the hot sun all day?
    2. Why don't you manufacture all of your parts in the US?
    3. Where are your parts manufactured?
    4. Just wanting to know what a complete body for a 56 Bel air 210 sedan (post car) would run. with the wider tubs?
    5. I am interested in your 1955-57 Chevy Nomad Right Door but was wondering if they can be ordered with the trim holes pre-drilled for a 1956 Nomad?
    6. Does Real Deal make their own parts?
  5. General
  6. Privacy Policy
    1. Communications
    2. Brochure Mailing List
    3. Communications to Serve You
    4. Fraud Protection and Compliance with Law
    5. Service Providers
    6. Special Events
    7. Business Transfers
    8. Cookies, IP Addresses, Pixel Tags and Tracking Technology
    9. Use of Aggregate Information
    10. Links
    11. Security
    12. Notification of Policy Changes
    13. Updating Personal Information
    14. Contacting Us
  7. Shipping & Returns
    1. What shipping options are available?
    2. Is there a cost on returns?
    3. Do you ship outside of the USA?
    4. What if an item is out of stock?

What Does Officially Licensed Mean?

Q: Why is it licensed?

Products (parts or apparel) and bodies must be licensed when they are seen by the licensor (GM or Ford in our case) to represent a trademarked design or logo (use of “Chevrolet”, “Camaro”, the Chevy bowtie, “Ford”, etc.). In these cases, the licensee (in this case Real Deal Steel) is obligated to “officially license” the item before it is offered for sale. To explain trade dress, this quite simply means in our case “if it looks like a ’57 Chevy or a ’69 Camaro”, then it must be licensed. If we build a body with no skins (a skeleton) then, it does not look like a ’57 Chevy or a ’69 Camaro therefore it does not have to be licensed. The minute features are added that begin to suggest the overall body design (quarter panels, top skin) it must be licensed. Some manufacturers will voluntarily license a product even though it does not require a license just so the item can carry the “officially licensed” logo.

Q: Why isn’t it licensed?

Any item that does not carry a logo, name or script does not have to be licensed. Similarly, any reproduction body that does not violate "trade dress" (does not appear to represent an original manufacturer's design)is not required to carry a license. There are also body styles that the manufacturer may deem as too old or irrelevant to enforce a license on. For example: bumpers, bumper brackets, steering wheels, fenders, doors, wheels, weatherstripping, upholstery - does not require a license to produce and sell. Interestingly, even though the tailfin design on the ’57 Chevy is trademarked by GM, GM does not enforce the license on these. We know of no reproduction 1957 Chevy quarter panels that are licensed.

Q: Which one is better?

Does the fact that a product is licensed make it superior in any way to one that is unlicensed? In some ways, yes. When “the Big-3” actively became involved in licensing aftermarket products some 20+ years ago, it was Ford Motor Company that led the charge. Edsel Ford III (who is a car guy) spent some time walking the car shows and swap meets and began to see all types of Ford products for sale that his company did not make in-house. Edsel observed that the quality of some of the parts was poor, and what concerned him was that his family name was on junk parts. So, Ford began to require samples of all reproduction items that carried any Ford logo or trademark for approval and licensing. Those who did not comply (continued selling unlicensed products that were subject to license) were soon contacted by Ford’s attorneys and forced to comply or cease and desist. Realizing that licensing aftermarket products was potentially beneficial in providing a revenue stream as well as helping protect consumers from poor products and thereby protecting their trademark and brand, Chrysler and GM were not far behind in beginning licensing programs. When the Big-3 licensing programs first began, licensees were expected to produce only very high-quality items to be sold as licensed. The Big-3 promised that they would maintain strict standards and quality control on all licensed items. As time wore on, and the revenues generated for the Big-3 became more important, they began to license just about anything regardless of quality. That is when the entire licensing program began to lose credibility with manufacturers and consumers alike. Within the last year (2014-2015), GM has begun to realize that lax quality standards on products have hurt both the consumer that expects to be "protected" by the license as well as the GM brand name. GM is beginning to return to tougher quality standards when offering product licenses and is now engaged in a more rigorous follow-up and correction when consumers or fellow manufacturers have concerns about the quality of licensed products. This increased concern helps all involved - the licensor (GM, by improving the profile of their brand with consumers); the licensee (manufacturers like Real Deal Steel who must maintain or improve the quality of their products to remain viable - which in turn helps sales because customers are more likely to purchase when products are better) and more importantly, the customer, who is now more assured that the license program is working for them by giving them better products!

Q: Do GM and Ford inspect and endorse the products?

For small parts (emblems, shirts, etc.) most licensors do require that you submit a sample for inspection. A few substandard products still clear the inspection hurdle but inspection by the licensor certainly helps improve overall quality. Ford, GM and Chrysler all now inspect reproduction bodies and follow-up with spot inspections. GM is known to address and help correct issues that consumers have with substandard licensed products. However, buyers should always do their own research when making the decision to buy any product - particularly something as expensive as a car body.

Q: Do GM and Ford control the quality of the products?

Yes - but, the quality control must not only be a function of the licensor (GM, Ford, Chrysler); it must also be a concern of the manufacturer/licensee who must produce the best possible products and self-police their segment of the industry and the customer who should make it know to the manufacturer and the licensor when they feel they have received a substandard licensed product.

Q: What does licensing cost?

We have all heard the saying “Corporations don’t pay taxes; their customers do!” That simply means that the more a corporation is taxed, the more they charge their customers for the products they sell to maintain profitability. Thus, the end user (you) pays the taxes. It is no different with licensing. Most license fees are 8-10% of the sales price of the item. If we (the licensor) sell you an item for $10, $1 of what you pay us is going to the licensor. The higher price you pay for a licensed product does offer the customer some protections as well as a voice as discussed in the previous paragraphs.

Registration Questions

Q: What kind of records and paperwork do I need to register the car?

A bill of sale (invoice issued by selling dealer) is acceptable if the manufacturer didn’t issue an MSO. Completed Application For Certificate Of Title (from your state DMV). Notarized affidavit, stating that the vehicle is able to be operated on public roads. The statement must also list the repairs made to the vehicle. Bills of sale or receipts for all parts and equipment that weren’t part of the body. All documents must include name and address of seller. Components may include front end, rear end, doors, engine, transmission, frame, cowl assembly, or any parts of those elements. Applicable sales tax (or fill out the statement on sales tax on the application form). License plate number for the vehicle (If using an existing plate), or an affidavit of non-use. Applicable title fees.

Q: What is an MSO (MCO)?

An MSO or MCO is short for a manufacturer’s statement (or certificate) of origin. At Real Deal Steel, we are not a vehicle manufacturer. We are a body assembly company, thus we do not issue an MSO or MCO. We do, however, issue a body number and invoice (by selling dealer) that will take the place of the MSO when registering your vehicle in your state.

Q: What if I have an existing title and VIN?

We DO NOT suggest using the VIN plate from an original car transferred onto a Real Deal Steel body. Particularly if you are a shop building the car for a customer. This practice can get you into a heap of trouble. However, if you hold clear title to an original frame to be used under your Real Deal Steel body, have the state inspect the frame and verify the VIN before assembly. For 1955-57 Chevrolet passenger car frames, the VIN is stamped in two places on top of the driver’s side frame rail. In most cases, your state will issue you a readable VIN plate/tag that matches your frame and title that may be displayed on the body.

Q: More helpful tips for you:

Just like any dealing with the government, proper record-keeping is the secret to making this process easy! In addition, we recommend:

  1. Before you do anything on your project, know what kind of documentation that the state is going to require for issuing title. Get fact sheets from your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles. Many times, these are available from the state website. Or if you don’t like downloading stuff, you can probably get them or find out how to order at your local DMV office. Once you get the fact sheets, read them carefully, and keep all of that information in mind as you buy your parts and build your car.
  2. Always get proper documentation when you purchase a part. Whenever you buy any part, and especially for major parts like engines, frames and probably transmissions, make sure you get adequate proof of purchase documentation. You can never have too much, so keep all bills of sale, invoices (especially mail order parts), and even canceled checks, and credit card receipts or statements. As applicable, make sure each document accurately records the relevant information. For example a bill of sale should have the vendor’s name and address, your name, a description of the part, and the amount and date of purchase. For major components like engines, make sure the bill has the VIN or serial number on it.
  3. Keep a build diary. From the very first part you buy keep a build diary. Each entry in the diary should be dated. When recording a purchase of a part, all relevant information should be written into the diary, including vendor’s name and address, date of purchase, description of part (including condition), price paid, and any identifying marks. Each major step in the build process should be recorded in the diary. Things like major component disassembly/assembly, sanding/blasting, painting, etc. should be recorded. If you send a part out to a contractor, record a description of the part, purpose for sending out (e.g., painting), date out and back, and costs (in order to get a title, you probably will have to get an appraisal of the finished car, and this kind of information can prove to be indispensable). All major steps in the build process should be documented with photographs before and after. VIN and serial numbers should be documented by photographs or rubbings, or both. Finally, keep the build diary current and up to date. Keep in mind that the diary is your document made to augment things like bills of sale, invoices and etc. Because it is your document the argument could be that you can make it say anything you want it to say. However, there is a long and strong tradition in American law to treat such records as reliable evidence as long as certain criteria are met.
  4. Simple adherence to the above principals should go a long way to avoiding problems in getting the finished car titled. It’s really not that hard as long as you keep good records and follow the rules your state has set forth.

Q: How do I title and register a car built using a Real Deal Steel body?

If you do not have a new or original chassis with a title or MSO, you will need to register the car built with a Real Deal Steel body as a “Newly Assembled” vehicle with your state. While we do not issue an MSO, you will be issued a Bill Of Sale (your purchase invoice) by the dealer you purchased your body from. This invoice will be considered as an MSO by your state DMV (check your local laws and regulations). In most cases, the body number issued by Real Deal Steel for your body will be used as or incorporated into the vehicle identification number (VIN) assigned by your state DMV when you register the car. You can find state specific information by visiting the SEMA Action Network’s page, Click here (opens a new window).


Body Questions

Q: What sequence should I replace the floor, trunk floor and inner quarters on my rotted '57 convertible? - Dwayne

Replacing both the floors and the inner quarters is a big job. Before you remove the floor and trunk floor, you should build a simple x-brace fixture in the main inner floor area and brace front-to-rear between the base of the A&B-pillars (hinge pillar and rear door jamb) to keep your door gaps from moving. You should build yourself a simple fixture on the existing body before you cut the original inner quarters out so you can locate the new ones in the same spot. I would built it to have several touch/clamp points at the upper and lower rear and at the b-pillar (rear edge of doors) area. The fixture should tie into your a-pillars (front door pillars) and the rear of the top structure (on a closed car). Also be sure it maintains the width of the inner quarter at the trunk opening. All of this is best completed with the body on the frame and not on a rotisserie. Build your fixtures with the body on the frame, then remove it from the frame when cutting everything out. Replace the inner quarters with the body removed from the frame Then place your floor and trunk floor on the frame and sit the body down over it until all land in the right spot and weld away!Once your fixtures are in place and will not move, remove the floor, trunk floor and inner quarters. Install the inner quarters first, then the front floor then the trunk floor. It is a good idea to re-hang your doors and deck lid as soon as you can to check and correct any door or trunk gap issues. Best of luck!

Q: I'm interested in a 1969 Camaro coupe body. How does your build compare to that done by Dynacorn?

Good and often asked question! We like to think our bodies are much superior to those offered by Dynacorn (Dii), and based on customer feedback, it is true. First, our bodies are entirely built in the US by US workers. Dii assembles their bodies in Taiwan. We are much fussier about fit and finish than the assemblers of the Dii bodies. We are all car guys, so we like for the end product to be something that we would want to build into a finished car. The other major difference is the exterior skins. We use only 18 gauge quarters, doors, deck lid, rear panels etc. from AMD. The Dii cars use much lighter weight 20 gauge skin panels.

Q: I'm in the process of restoring a '57 Chevy 2-door sedan that will require some extensive sheet metal replacement -- including the full floor, both rear quarters, tail pan, fin panels, and possibly the inner quarters. My plan was to go with the pre-widene

The main floor has a vertical "pinchweld" flange (points up) along the entire edge that attaches to the top of the outer rockers in the door area and to a similar "pinchweld" flange on the bottom of the inner quarters in the quarter window area. This attachment is exactly the same as for hardtop and convertible. You can simply stitch weld this flange from the top with your wire feed welder. The trunk floor has a vertical "pinchweld" flange (points down) that attaches to the lower flat walls of the trunk floor/wheelhouse areas. The 2-door sedan quarter tops are more complex. The quarters were actually installed on the body before the drip rails and top skin were installed. First the roof (top) structure, then the quarters (there is a 1" extension on the upper quarters you cannot see hidden by the top skin/drip rails), the the drip rails and last the top skin. If you are careful, you can weld the new quarter to the underside of the drip rail flange and hide the repair with seam sealer without disturbing the original sips and top!

Q: I have one of your new '57 2-door sedan bodies. Would you mind telling me the 57 model frames that will fit the 2-door sedan body?

Any 1957 2-door sedan, 4-door sedan, 2 or 4-door station wagon, Nomad or 2-door hardtop will work fine. Avoid the 4-door hardtop and convertible frames. If you use a 2-door hardtop frame, there will be two extra mounts on the frame just behind the B-pillars that will need to be removed (or ignored).

Q: I have a 1957 Chevy 2-door post. It was a race car most of its life and I'd like to convert it to a convertible/roadster. I know the door line on the post is straight across, rather than gently sloping, like the bel air and convertible.

Often asked question! If you want to build a true convertible with roll-up quarter windows and a convertible top rack, you'll need to purchase one of our "Clipster" bodies with quarters CL57C-12. The entire rear body tub on the convertible is unique thus your sedan body tub cannot be used. The Clipster allows you to use your sedan cowl and firewall and convert it to convertible using the windshield frame included with the Clipster.

You can also use your sedan chassis under your new convertible body after upgrading it with our tubular frame kit TFK-567 and frame brackets SFB-567

Q: Do you offer any special order modifications for the 1968 Camaro? I was thinking along the lines of shaving drip rails and filling side marker lights.

Filling the side markers is easy - we use 1967 quarters instead of 1968. We have done this for several customers to date. We have been asked to shave the drip rails on several Camaro orders but have not been able to offer this. The top skin actually overhangs the roof structure by 1/4" to 3/8" (hangs down) so the edge/gutter portion of the top skin actually attaches to the drip rail fairly far down/away from the top structure. Shaving the drips can be done, but that is heavy custom work best handled by your bodyman.

Q: Do you have bodies in stock?

Most often, no. We usually build all bodies to order with anywhere from a 30-day to a 120-day lead time depending on time of year and parts availability. Rarely, a single component part may be unavailable for up to 6-months which can cause additional delays in body builds. The best time to order a body is during the summer months - this is when we have fewer orders and can process new orders more quickly. Our busiest time is November - March.

Parts Questions

Q: Would Buzzkil sound deadener be suitable for insulating the roof over the headliner in a 56 Chevy? Would it stay attached to the roof and NEVER fall down onto the headliner even when sitting out in the hot sun all day?

It is prefect for top (roof) panels before headliner installation. Thicker sound deadeners create issues with the headliner wires fitting where they are supposed to but not a problem with Buzzkil. Buzzkil has much better adhesion than any other sound deadener we have ever used, however, the underside of your top panel must be clean and frre of rust and the old felt mat and any residue. If not perfectly clean, we recommend using 3M Super Trim Spray Adhesive on the underside of the top and on the backside of Buzzkil. This will improve adhesion if you do not have a clean surface to attach it to.

Q: Why don't you manufacture all of your parts in the US?

We often submit samples to a US manufacturer and an overseas manufacturer. Depending on the material the part is made from and the complexity of the part, sometimes it makes sense to have the part made in the US and sometimes it is smarter to make the part overseas. For example, all of the complex stampings for our full bodies are made overseas. Could we have had the parts manufactured in the US? Yes, but instead of a quarter panel that can be sold for $899. that same item manufactured in the US might cost $2000. Having these types of parts manufactured in the US would drive the cost of our parts and bodies above what a customer can afford to pay. Additionally, most of the US stamping plants (located in Ohio and Michigan)are so busy stamping parts for the "Big Three" as well as foreign makes that manufacture bodies in the US that scheduling production runs in the US is very difficult.

Q: Where are your parts manufactured?

Real Deal sources parts from Taiwan, ROC as well as the US. Most of our body sheet metal is manufactured in Taiwan. Don't let this scare you - as the quality is very good to excellent. The sheet metal we stock and sell is the very same sheet metal we use to build our new steel car bodies.

Q: Just wanting to know what a complete body for a 56 Bel air 210 sedan (post car) would run. with the wider tubs?

We do not offer complete bodies for any of the 1956 cars except for convertible. Full quarter panels are unavailable for 1956 hardtop and sedan. We can, however, build the skeleton with dash for $12,500 add the tubs $1,250. total $13,750. The body would come with drip rails and a top skin, but you would need to add quarters at your end.

Q: I am interested in your 1955-57 Chevy Nomad Right Door but was wondering if they can be ordered with the trim holes pre-drilled for a 1956 Nomad?

The Nomad doors come with no trim holes so they can be universally used for 1955-57 Nomad and Pontiac Safari. You can use your original door to make a large craft paper template and drill holes in the new door. The new holes will be round and not square as the originals, but the new style clips work fine in round holes.

Q: Does Real Deal make their own parts?

Yes. Though we do not manufacture in Florida, we have over 100 items that are proprietary to us. That means we submitted the sample, approved or made corrections to the prototype, approved the final sample and instructed the manufacturer to run production for us. Those items are available only from us or through one of our dealers.

Privacy Policy

Q: Communications

If you select during the order process or at other times when you submit personally identifiable information, the information you provide may be used by Real Deal Steel to create and deliver to you our newsletters, surveys or other communications containing product information. If you prefer not to receive such Communications, please do not select the ‘Please inform me option’. If you do select this option and later decide that you would no longer like to receive these communications, please use the features made available to you.

Q: Brochure Mailing List

If you have requested a Real Deal Steel brochure, all information is kept completely confidential and is not shared with any third parties. We may, on occasion, send you an updated catalog or brochure. If you do not wish to receive any mail from Real Deal Steel, please contact us via email at . Include your name and mailing address and email address. You will be removed from any future mailings.

Q: Communications to Serve You

If you have elected to provide us with your contact information, e.g., by registering at the Site, emailing our Customer Service department or placing an order, we may provide you with service related announcements concerning the Site or contact you regarding your customer service requests or your order. For example, all registered users will receive an email to confirm their order. These types of communications are necessary to serve you, respond to your concerns and to provide the high level of customer service that Real Deal Steel offers its customers.

Disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information

We will never provide your personally identifiable information to third parties for their use in marketing their products or services to you without your consent. Real Deal Steel takes great pride in having you as a customer and we will ensure your privacy as a customer. Real Deal Steel does not sell or exchange names or any other information about our customers with third parties.

Q: Fraud Protection and Compliance with Law

We may disclose any information, including personally identifiable information, we deem necessary, in our sole discretion, to comply with any applicable law, regulation, legal process or governmental request. We may also exchange information, including personally identifiable information, with other companies and organizations for credit fraud protection and risk reduction.

Q: Service Providers

We may retain other companies and individuals to perform functions consistent with our Privacy Policy on our behalf. Examples include customer support specialists, web hosting companies, fulfillment companies (e.g., companies that fill product orders or coordinate mailings), data analysis firms and email service providers. Such third parties may be provided with access to personally identifiable information needed to perform their functions, but may not use such information for any other purpose.

Q: Special Events

If you elect to participate in any promotions, sweepstakes, surveys, questionnaires or other events during your visit to our Site, the rules or terms and conditions for those events may indicate that your personally identifiable information will be shared with third parties. By choosing to participate and submitting your personally identifiable information with respect to such events, you consent to disclosure of your personally identifiable information to such third parties.

Q: Business Transfers

As we continue to develop our business, we might sell certain of our assets. In such transactions, user information, including personally identifiable information, generally is one of the transferred business assets, and by submitting your personal information on the Site you agree that your data may be transferred to such parties in these circumstances.

Q: Cookies, IP Addresses, Pixel Tags and Tracking Technology

We may place a "cookie" on your computer's hard drive so we can recognize you as a return user and personalize your experience. A cookie is a piece of data that enables us to track and target your preferences. The cookie will be stored on your computer's hard drive until you remove it. We may also use temporary or "session" cookies to help you shop. These cookies will expire when you place an order. You can have your browser notify you of, or automatically reject, cookies. If you reject our cookies, you may still use the Site, but you may be limited in the use of some of the features. In addition, we may use IP addresses to analyze trends, administer the Site, track traffic patterns, and gather demographic information for aggregate use, as well as in combination with your personally identifiable information for credit fraud protection and risk reduction.

Similarly, when you visit this Site or view one of our emails, we may use pixel tags (also called "clear" gifs), tracking links and/or similar technology to note some of the pages you visit on our Site and personalize your experience. We may also use pixel tags to determine what types of email your browser supports. We may use the information collected through pixel tags, tracking links and similar technology in combination with your personally identifiable information.

realdealsteel.com does recognize your ISP (internet service provider), however, we cannot identify you as an individual. If you make an on-line purchase we do collect information (such as sales statistics and traffic patterns) to help improve your shopping experience. We keep all information confidential.

Q: Use of Aggregate Information

We may use the information you provide in aggregate (non-personally identifiable) form for internal business purposes, such as generating statistics and developing marketing plans. We may collect, store or accumulate certain non-personally identifiable information concerning your use of the Site, such as information regarding which of our pages are most popular. We may share or transfer non-personally identifiable information with or to our affiliates, licensees and partners.

Q: Links

This Privacy Policy applies only to the information collected on this Site. Our Site may contain links to or from other websites and you should be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of other websites. We encourage you to read the privacy policies of other websites linked to the Site.

Q: Security

Real Deal Steel seeks to protect the security of your personal information both online and offline. All credit card transactions are secure. Every on-line order is encrypted and sent through a secure server, using SSL technology to prevent information from being intercepted.

Confidential information such as your credit card number will be used only to fulfill your order. To protect your privacy, we will ask you to enter your credit card number and expiration date each time you place an order with us. This way, even if someone else accesses the account information stored on your computer, they won't be able to use your credit card.

E-mail is not encrypted and is not a secure means to transmit credit card numbers. We will only display the last 4 digits of your credit card number on your account.

Q: Notification of Policy Changes

Real Deal Steel reserves the right to revise this Privacy Policy in the future by posting changes at this location and we may make changes at any time without notification.

Q: Updating Personal Information

If you are a registered member at Real Deal Steel, you can change your personal information at any time by updating your information at check-out.

Q: Contacting Us

We welcome your comments and questions about privacy. Please send email to info@realdealsteel.com.

We are confident that your visit to Real Deal Steel is secure and safe. However, you may choose to call us directly to place your order over the telephone. Please call Customer Service toll free at 407-585-1957.


Shipping & Returns

Q: What shipping options are available?

Online orders will be shipped via Fedex Ground, Fedex Express or Truck Freight. For all Truck Freight shipments, please provide a commercial (business) ship-to address for optimal service. We do not ship to P.O. boxes.

Q: Is there a cost on returns?

If an item needs to be returned the shipping fees are the customer's responsibility. All returned items must be in as-new condition with original packaging. Primed, painted, cut or installed items cannot be returned. All returns are subject to a 20% restocking fee.

Q: Do you ship outside of the USA?

We ship anywhere in the continental USA plus Alaska and Hawaii . We are happy to ship orders outside the USA to your shipping consolidator, agent, broker or border representative.

Q: What if an item is out of stock?

.Items not in stock at the time of your order will be placed on backorder. You will be notified immediately via email if an item is out of stock and you will be advised of the expected ship date.